Path, and why I’m liking it

Path‘s a new little social iPhone application which has gained some attention over the last week.

It calls itself a ‘personal network’, largely because you’re limited to 50 contacts. This, as you can imagine in a world where hundreds of Facebook friends and thousands of Twitter followers rule, is one of the aspects which has caught people’s attention most.

Path’s thinking is that with only 50 contacts max, you’ll think carefully about who’s in your network and subsequently be more comfortable about what you might be sharing with them. I like that.

I also like the fact that it’s picture based. It’s very simple. You take a picture with your iPhone, say what it is, where it is and who’s in it (though it doesn’t force you to include all of these) and then you post it. That’s it. It’s a bit like Foursquare, or Facebook’s Places, but uses pictures instead of only text. I like that too.

The way it presents the pictures from your friends is very nice. A letterbox crop until you touch it and then expanding to the full image. Like.

There are a couple of things that I think would add to it. The main one would be being able to comment on other people’s pictures. I’d also like to be able to use any of the images on my camera. I’ve taken a couple of pictures with my phone that I’ve subsequently thought I’d have like to have stuck on Path and can’t see a way to.

So is there a point to Path? I’m not sure as yet. I’m enjoying it, but I’m not sure whether I’ll continue to do so. It really needs – as ever – more of my friends and contacts using it. 50 contacts might seem restrictive to some, but I’ve only got five right now. It would be easy to dismiss it as not very useful. But a lot of people did that with Twitter at launch (myself included) and have changed their minds now (myself included).

I do find the idea of capping the number of people you can have in an online network interesting though, and was wondering whether the same limits might be useful in other places. Perhaps a number of different and small niche networks for specific areas of interest would be a good idea? I already run two Twitter accounts for instance.

Of course it depends on the type of content you’re posting in the network. I’m more than happy for my LinkedIn network to grow as big as it might like to, as long as I genuinely know every person in it (even if not very well). I certainly think that the breadth of my Facebook network makes me think twice about some of the content I post there, which it shouldn’t do really, so I reckon I could do with shrinking that one a bit.

Food for thought.

PR Week digital ramble

PRW_DIGI10_Shine_021

As requested, here’s a pdf of the Shine essay in the PR Week digital supplement, penned by your’s truly. As such, it’s a bunch of old pony.

(NB: I’m not entirely sure that I’m allowed to post this up here. It might upset the powers that be at PR Week. If so, let me know and I’ll take it down.)

Ad agencies transforming. As discussed.

About 10 months ago I posted this following an essay by Edelman‘s Jackie Cooper. Jackie’s essay was called “Why It’s Time for Ad Agencies to Admit defeat” and in it she claimed (as many people have done over the past few years) that PR agencies rather than ad agencies were the ones best placed to take advantage of the brave new world of communications.

My point was that she was ignoring the fact that ad agencies might be able to adapt and evolve, and also the not insignificant advantage that they already hold the vast majority of a client’s marketing budget and therefore had the relatively simpler task of persuading a client to spend it in a different way.

This morning I read this piece in The Guardian: “Digital technology and social networking breathe new life into advertising.”

Wonderful thing, evolution.

Media relations…still got it

As featured on The Media Blog (and Twitter, obviously).

Narcissistic Personality Disorder

I read an incredibly interesting article in the FT Weekend magazine about narcissism.

It includes this list of character traits which are typical of a victim of Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

Strikes me that it might be pretty common…

NPD – the diagnosis

A victim of narcissistic personality disorder will exhibit at least five of the following traits

1. A grandiose sense of self-importance

2. A preoccupation with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love

3. A belief that he or she is “special” and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people (or institutions)

4. A requirement for excessive admiration

5. A sense of entitlement – unreasonable expectations of especially favourable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations

6. Interpersonal exploitativeness – taking advantage of others to achieve his or her own ends

7. A lack of empathy and an unwillingness to recognise or identify with the feelings and needs of others

8. Enviousness of others – along with the belief that others are envious of him or her

9. A tendency to arrogant, haughty behaviours or attitudes

Source: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV

Separated at birth?

Something here, definitely.

One of these blokes cooks up stuff from any number of interesting ingredients. The other is a TV chef. Mark Borkowski and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.

The Google Instant alphabet

Saw a tweet from Andy Barr about brands competing to be the first result presented when a single letter is typed into a Google Instant search. Got me intrigued… the A-Z for google.co.uk is below. Interesting that the one being cited by a lot of blog posts and articles is ‘w’, which returns ‘weather’. It’s the only non-brand or product in the list! Well, that’s if you accept utube for ‘u’.

Argos
BBC
Currys
Debenhams
eBay
Facebook
Google maps
Hotmail
ITV
John Lewis
KLM
Lotto
MSN
Next
O2
PayPal
QVC
Rightmove
Sky
Tesco
Utube
Virgin
Weather
Xbox
YouTube
Zara

Tagged ,

@OhDoctah vs. @OldSpice

Just love this. Brilliant.

For most of the next week…

…I’ll be sat on a bike riding across 700km of beautiful French countryside, including some very big hills, with some of the best people I’m privileged to know. It’s all for charity of course.

To hear a bit more about it and to follow our exploits, take a look at Les Veloistes Gentils blog.

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